Vaccines made in China – another ridiculous anti-vax myth

Vaccines made in China

One of the most ridiculous myths of the anti-vaccine world is that vaccines made in China dominate the US market. I took a look at every vaccine licensed for use in America to determine where they are manufactured. Spoiler alert – none are made in China.

I didn’t even know this was an anti-vaccine myth until recently. But once I looked into the topic, it was clearly prevalent in the anti-vaccine world. Many vaccines are manufactured in the USA, but the remainder are made in Canada, Japan and Europe.

Here’s a list of the most important vaccines licensed in the United States with their location of manufacture. Continue reading “Vaccines made in China – another ridiculous anti-vax myth”

Gardasil safety and efficacy – debunking the HPV vaccine myths

Gardasil safety and efficacy

There was an article published in Pediatrics that described how educating either teenagers or their parents about HPV vaccinations had little effect on the overall vaccination rate for the vaccine. Essentially, the researchers found that it was a 50:50 probability that any teen would get the vaccine, regardless of their knowledge of HPV and the vaccine itself. Some of the reasons why the HPV vaccine uptake is so low is a result of several myths about Gardasil safety and efficacy.

So I thought about why that Pediatrics study found that education about HPV and Gardasil didn’t move the needle on vaccination uptake. It’s possible that the benefits of the vaccine is overwhelmed by two factors–first, that there’s a disconnect between personal activities today vs. a disease that may or may not show up 20-30 years from now; and second, that the invented concerns about the HPV quadrivalent vaccine, promulgated by the usual suspects in the antivaccination world, makes people think that there is a clear risk from the vaccine which is not balanced by preventing cancer decades from now. It’s frustrating. Continue reading “Gardasil safety and efficacy – debunking the HPV vaccine myths”

Dorit Rubinstein Reiss – an index of contributions to this website

Dorit Rubinstein Reiss

Dorit Rubinstein Reiss – Professor of Law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law (San Francisco, CA) – is a frequent contributor to this and many other blogs, providing in-depth, and intellectually stimulating, articles about vaccines (generally, but sometimes moving to other areas of medicine), social policy and the law. Her articles usually unwind the complexities of legal issues with vaccinations and legal policies, such as mandatory vaccination and exemptions, with facts and citations. I know a lot of writers out there will link to one of her articles here as a sort of primary source to tear down a bogus antivaccine message.

Professor Reiss writes extensively in law journals about the social and legal policies of vaccination–she really is a well-published expert in this area of vaccine policy, and doesn’t stand on the pulpit with a veneer of Argument from Authority, but is actually an authority. Additionally, Reiss is also member of the Parent Advisory Board of Voices for Vaccines, a parent-led organization that supports and advocates for on-time vaccination and the reduction of vaccine-preventable disease.

Below is a list of articles that Dorit Rubinstein Reiss has written for this blog, organized into some arbitrary and somewhat broad categories for easy reference. This article will be updated as new articles from Professor Reiss are added here.

Continue reading “Dorit Rubinstein Reiss – an index of contributions to this website”

Vaccines cause SIDS? Not supported by Boatmon vs HHS case

vaccines cause SIDS

This is about the case of little J. B. Boatmon, who was born born four weeks prematurely, at the 36th week.  However, he rebounded from his early start, and at his four-months well baby pediatric visit, on September 2 was doing very well and found healthy.  At that visit, J.B. had the routine 4 months vaccines. Tragically, the next day (September 3) little J.B. was found lifeless in his crib. His death was ruled to be the result of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). But did vaccines cause SIDS in J.B.?

His parents filed suit under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP). The case was decided on July 10, 2017. Special Master  Thomas L. Gowen with the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program  granted J.B’s parents compensation.

In August 2017 the Boatmon decision was shared on anti-vaccine sites as evidence that vaccines cause SIDS. The decision does not, however, support the claim because it is flawed internally in several ways. It misuses and discounts the epidemiological evidence, accepts a problematic theory over the objection of a more qualified expert, and ignores several of the important factors of the case. In addition to its internal flaws, the decision is in tension with many other decisions of NVICP – in fact, it seems an outlier – and it is interesting that the same sites that tout this problematic decision ignore other decisions that ruled otherwise. Continue reading “Vaccines cause SIDS? Not supported by Boatmon vs HHS case”

Medical exemption abuse – hurting California’s vaccine uptake

Medical exemption abuse

Since the enactment of California’s SB277, which prevents parents from using religious or personal beliefs to excuse their children from vaccinations, has lead to much higher vaccine uptake rates in California schools. The law still allows medical exemptions, which are medically-related reasons for not vaccinating, such as allergies to ingredients in the vaccine. Unfortunately, this had led to medical exemption abuse in many schools in California.

In California, medical exemptions require a form signed by their doctor stating a valid medical reason for any child to not receive vaccines. Generally, less than 2-3% of children would have medical reasons to not be vaccinated. Moreover, most of these children would only be exempt from a few vaccines, not all of them. Continue reading “Medical exemption abuse – hurting California’s vaccine uptake”

California SB277 lawsuit update – judge rejected Torrey-Love

California SB277 lawsuit

On August 15, 2017 Judge Charles D. Wachob from the Placer County Superior court granted the state’s demurrer to the California SB277 lawsuit (known as Torrey-Love).  In lay terms, dismissed the suit without leave to amend. Demurrer is generally granted when, assuming all the facts plaintiffs claimed are true, the court sees no legal basis for the suit, in technical terms, no cause of action. Continue reading “California SB277 lawsuit update – judge rejected Torrey-Love”

Alternative medicine cancer treatment – increased death rate

Alternative medicine cancer treatment

One of the most annoying subjects that catch my eye on a regular basis is an alternative medicine cancer treatment that pervades the internet. I find it disheartening when people risk their lives for unproven pseudoscience over treatments that are supported with real scientific evidence.

Moreover, it is not my opinion that an alternative medicine cancer treatment is less effective than conventional cancer treatments. There is solid evidence that alternative medicine is worse.

Let’s take a look at this evidence. Continue reading “Alternative medicine cancer treatment – increased death rate”

Pet vaccinations – old anti-vaccine canards show up again

pet vaccinations

Recently, I dealt with the lame myth that dogs might get autism from vaccines. No, they won’t. Now a new article in the online magazine Salon is digging up every anti-vaccine myth to try to convince people to reduce pet vaccinations.

In the recently published article, Salon, who gave a pulpit to Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s unscientific and ignorant anti-vaccine rants (and subsequently retracted it after withering criticism), try to make a claim that we over-vaccinate our pets with no consideration to the health of our pets.

And to do this, Salon appeared to turn to the anti-vaccine handbook to bring up every myth that we’ve debunked in human vaccinations but applying it to pet vaccinations. The article reads like “I support vaccines but…” It’s the “but” that matters, just making the article sound more anti-vaccine than pro-vaccine.

Time to take a look at this balderdash.

Continue reading “Pet vaccinations – old anti-vaccine canards show up again”

HPV vaccine and autoimmune diseases – no link in new 2 million patient study

HPV vaccine and autoimmune diseases

The link between HPV vaccine and autoimmune diseases is one of the enduring myths about Gardasil. It is regularly debunked by scientists in large scale case control studies, but that never appears to be enough to silence the critics.

For example, the so-called autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) pushed by an Israeli physician, Yehuda Shoenfeld remains a trope that pervades the anti-Gardasil community. Shoenfeld claims that the HPV vaccine is causally linked to various autoimmune syndromes. However, ASIA is not accepted by the scientific and medical community (and see this published article), and was rejected by the United States vaccine court. It should not be used by parents as a reason to reject the HPV vaccine..

Large studies (and this large study) continue to reject links between the HPV vaccine and autoimmune diseases. Now, we’re going to take a look at a recently published article that continues to reject any link.

Continue reading “HPV vaccine and autoimmune diseases – no link in new 2 million patient study”

Japan bans Gardasil – debunking myths about the HPV vaccine

Japan bans Gardasil

One of the most popular zombie memes and tropes of the anti-vaccination movement is that Japan bans Gardasil – oh noes! Of course, like a lot of the junk information passed along by the anti-vaccine crowd, it’s completely false, unless you’re willing to take anything they say on faith.

There are a couple of consistent trends in the anti-vaccine movement. They claim that vaccines cause autism (disproved with the highest quality of evidence); and they maintain that the HPV vaccines cause all kinds of harm to teens and young adults. And there are literally mountains of data derived from numerous huge epidemiological studies that the Gardasil cancer preventing vaccine is one of the safest vaccines on the market (and that’s a high bar to exceed, given the high safety profiles of all vaccines).

So if you really want to prevent cancer, one of the best ways available to you is getting the HPV vaccine. The idea is so simple, yet is clouded by the myths about HPV vaccines – one of the most popular, of course, is that Japan bans Gardasil. Let’s examine this fable with a critical and skeptical eye.

The tl;dr version – Japan did no such thing.

Continue reading “Japan bans Gardasil – debunking myths about the HPV vaccine”