Why we vaccinate–because the flu can be deadly to healthy people

flu-shot-coolThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has published its most recent weekly report for the current flu outbreak in the United States (note: this link is to a non-static website where the numbers are updated weekly, so they may not match what is posted below). Here’s some of the most important data:

  • 2,622 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations have been reported since October 1, 2013. This represents a cumulative rate of 9.7 hospitalizations per 100,000 people in the United States.
  • Of the 2,622 influenza-associated hospitalizations that have been reported this season, 61.6% have been in people 18 to 64 years old, much younger than typical flu outbreaks where most flu hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older. This pattern of more hospitalizations among younger people was also observed during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.
  • Widespread influenza activity was reported by 35 states.
  • Ten pediatric deaths have been reported for the flu since the beginning of the flu season–traditionally the peak numbers for deaths of children from the flu happens in the first three months of the year.

So, based on this information, flu doesn’t just send the elderly or those with chronic diseases to the hospital. Influenza related hospitalizations have hit healthy young adults in higher proportions. And the flu kills children. Despite all the garbage that’s placed on the internet, the black hole of accurate, scientific data, there is only one way to boost your immune system to prevent getting the flu–the seasonal flu vaccine.

In case you believe in some myth about the flu vaccine, here’s some real science about the flu and the flu vaccine for you:

If the science of flu vaccines doesn’t convince you, then you really are a dumbass.

Use the Science-based Vaccine Search Engine.

The Original Skeptical Raptor
Chief Executive Officer at SkepticalRaptor
Lifetime lover of science, especially biomedical research. Spent years in academics, business development, research, and traveling the world shilling for Big Pharma. I love sports, mostly college basketball and football, hockey, and baseball. I enjoy great food and intelligent conversation. And a delicious morning coffee!