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measles

Anti-vaxxers underestimate the dangers of measles

Measles is often underestimated as a benign disease, despite causing serious complications such as pneumonia, hearing loss, and a fatal brain condition called SSPE. The MMR vaccine is crucial for prevention, as measles can lead to death and long-term suppression of the immune system, making children more susceptible to other infections. Sadly, non-vaccinated individuals are enabling the spread of measles, exemplified by a case where a young girl named Angelina suffered and died from SSPE contracted as an infant. Vaccination is essential to prevent such tragic outcomes and protect public health.

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Eggplant (aubergine) and skin cancer — what does science say?

Despite internet claims about eggplant extract (BEC5) treating skin cancer, thorough research reveals no robust, clinical evidence supporting its efficacy. A study not validated by reputable journals or recognized by major medical societies is being overhyped without substantial backing. Medical professionals advise conventional treatments over unproven herbal remedies for skin cancer.

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New mRNA vaccine for pancreatic cancer enters phase 2 trials

A new personalized mRNA vaccine for pancreatic cancer, cevumeran, has shown promise in a phase 1 trial and is advancing to a larger phase 2 trial. It works by inducing an immune response against specific antigens in each patient’s tumor, offering hope for a disease with typically poor prognosis. Developed by BioNTech, cevumeran complements standard treatments like surgery and chemotherapy, potentially increasing overall success rates.

hard cash on a briefcase

COVID misinformation campaigns are very profitable

A Washington Post report reveals that anti-vaccine groups profited from COVID-19 misinformation, raising over $118 million from 2020 to 2022. Pre-pandemic revenue was dwarfed as groups like Children’s Health Defense and ICAN increased fundraising efforts and salaries for executives like RFK Jr and Del Bigtree. These organizations have promoted false narratives about COVID-19 vaccines and unsupported treatments, such as ivermectin, posing public health risks and undermining vaccine mandates for children’s diseases.

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Does drinking alcohol increase the risk of cancer?

The WHO suggests cutting alcohol lowers cancer risks, but evidence is mixed. A recent paper found limited or inadequate evidence of reduced cancer risk with lower alcohol consumption, specifically for cancers like laryngeal, colorectal, and breast cancer, while some links to oral and esophageal cancer were noted. Despite some findings, significant scientific gaps remain, and further research is needed to establish clearer connections between alcohol reduction and cancer risk.

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NFL star Travis Kelce posts a heart photo — anti-vaxxers go crazy

NFL star Travis Kelce, tagged “Mr. Pfizer,” came under anti-vaccine fire for an Instagram post where he made a heart shape with his hands, sparking baseless claims of vaccine dangers. Contrary to myths, COVID-19 vaccines have a much lower myocarditis risk than the virus itself, and other heart issues aren’t linked to the vaccine. The American Heart Association endorses vaccines, especially for those with heart conditions. Kelce’s gesture likely celebrated the Super Bowl win or expressed love, not a vaccine warning.

photography of woman in pink tank top stretching arm mRNA covid vaccine menstrual

Do COVID mRNA vaccines affect menstrual cycles?

Studies show mRNA COVID-19 vaccines can cause small, temporary changes in menstrual cycles, less so than the disease itself. In one research, vaccinated women experienced a minor increase in cycle length that normalized the following month. Another study linked the vaccine to a short-term risk of heavy menstrual bleeding. Despite these effects, the benefits of vaccination against COVID-19 outweigh these temporary menstrual changes.

an artist s illustration of artificial intelligence ai this image depicts how ai could assist in genomic studies and its applications it was created by artist nidia dias as part of the

DNA in food or vaccines is not going to change your genes

A poll revealed widespread fear of DNA in food and vaccines, leading to calls for mandatory labeling. This pervasive pseudoscience myth suggests that consuming or injecting DNA can alter human genetics. However, DNA from food and vaccines is broken down and does not integrate into human genes. Education on DNA biochemistry counters these fears, explaining that DNA and its four nucleobases (CGAT) are consistent across all life forms, simply coding for proteins. Massive studies on animals fed GMOs and vaccinated humans illustrate no adverse effects from DNA consumption or vaccine administration. Such concerns are scientifically unfounded; eating GMO foods or getting vaccines does not alter or harm one’s DNA.