Pfizer-Valneva Lyme disease vaccine — phase 2 pediatric trials results

lyme disease vaccine

I have previously discussed a Lyme disease vaccine candidate from Pfizer and Valneva that is starting a phase 3 clinical trial. However, the companies are keeping us updated with their phase 2 results, and there has been exciting news — the pediatric trial (in 5-17-year-olds) showed strong immunogenicity for the new Pfizer-Valneva vaccine.

Of course, dogs have had access to a Lyme disease vaccine, but there has not been a vaccine available for humans for over 20 years. It’s not that dogs are more important than humans (though many of us might argue that point), but about 20 years ago, the anti-vaxxers got the vaccine pulled from the market, one of their few “successes” in getting rid of useful vaccines.

But a small company, Valneva, in partnership with Pfizer, has developed a new vaccine that will be entering Phase 3 clinical trials real soon. Hopefully, we’ll have it in just a few more years.

Let’s first take a look at this disease, and then we will review the vaccine itself along with new results.

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Increased risk of shingles after COVID-19 — time to get both vaccines

shingles COVID-19

A newly published and peer-reviewed study provides evidence that the risk of shingles (herpes zoster) increases after a COVID-19 infection. This supports numerous case reports that have been published that describe shingles in COVID-19 patients.

This post will examine the article. And this should provide you with more evidence that the COVID-19 and shingles vaccines are important to your health.

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mRNA COVID vaccines are not associated with appendicitis

COVID-19 mRNA vaccines appendicitis

I did not know it was a thing, but there were concerns that appendicitis was associated with mRNA COVID-19 vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer. Of course, I wanted to look into it and see if it really was a thing.

Apparently, there was a safety signal for appendicitis that was first seen in Pfizer’s phase 3 clinical trial where a higher number of cases of appendicitis were observed. There were also some observations in Israel that showed an “excess risk of appendicitis of 5.0 episodes per 100,000 individuals after vaccination.

However, a new study carefully looked at new data and found no association between the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines and appendicitis. Let’s look at that study.

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Who is to blame for high insulin prices in the USA? Big Pharma?

insulin prices

Insulin prices are a big issue in the USA because they seem to be skyrocketing upwards much faster than inflation or anything else. Of course, people are blaming Big Pharma, because they seem to be the major culprits behind the gouging of diabetics.

However, like everything else, the facts behind insulin prices are much more complicated than what you might be reading in the most recent Facebook meme or post about the subject. Because a 4-line meme is so much easier than writing a complicated article about the world of insulin prices.

And I’m going to try to guide you through the travesty of how pharmaceuticals are priced and how it’s a total mess. And remember, this is only about America’s pharmaceutical pricing mess — hopefully, the rest of the world does this better.

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Physician vaccine hesitancy — new polling shows about 10% are anti-vaccine

physician vaccine

A new poll published in Vaccine showed that physician acceptance of vaccine safety, effectiveness, and importance was extremely high. However, physician vaccine hesitancy seemed to be higher than expected, with about 1 in 10 primary care physicians not believing that vaccines are safe.

I want to examine this poll about physician vaccine hesitancy and give my opinions on what was found.

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I got my Pfizer COVID vaccine booster — Bill Gates didn’t call me

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster

On 14 April 2022, I got my Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster shot. As with the first three shots (those were all from Moderna), I felt nothing other than a bit of a sore arm. I decided to with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster rather than getting a fourth Moderna shot because I kind of wanted to mix up the antigens a bit so that I had better protection. But I could have been just as happy going with the Moderna booster.

Now my immune system is scientifically boosted to handle whatever SARS-CoV-2 has for me. I’m ready to kick its sorry butt for even thinking about infecting me.

Why did I get the booster?

  • Because it’s safe.
  • Because the booster shots protect me against COVID-19 even more.
  • Because there is evidence that the original series of shots have waning immunity.
  • Because it’s the only way to boost my immune system against the coronavirus.
  • Because I know that vaccines are more powerful than pseudoscientific supplements and quackery.
  • Because the CDC recommends it.
  • Because it was free.
  • Because I want to do the right thing for my own health and to protect others.

I don’t know if boosters will be necessary every few months or years. But this virus is so resilient and mutates so frequently, I am willing to bet we will need frequent boosters for any of the COVID-19 vaccines.

In fact, early evidence appears to indicate we might need a second booster for the Omicron variant.

person getting vaccinated
Photo by Gustavo Fring on Pexels.com

Again, I experienced no side effects of any sort other than a tender arm. My 5G iPhone isn’t working any better. My heart is functioning quite well. Everything that was working before getting the booster is still working well now.

The CDC and FDA are recommending a second Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine booster for anyone who is over the age of 50 or is immunocompromised. That doesn’t mean all of you should rush to get the second booster, there’s probably no need. The evidence seems to indicate that one booster may be good enough for most people for the time being. But as with everything surrounding this pandemic, something might change next week or next month, or next year. Stay tuned.

But for now, your favorite feathered dinosaur (an avian or non-avian dinosaur to be specific) is protected against COVID-19.

I also got a Shingrix vaccination at the same time. Now begone Herpes zoster.

Now here are some cute pet photos because you spent the time reading about my boosters.

Photo by Sergey Semin on Unsplash
Photo by Mathis Jrdl on Unsplash
Photo by Krista Mangulsone on Unsplash
Avian dinosaurs. Photo by Roi Dimor on Unsplash

Robert Malone did not invent the mRNA vaccine — he now misinforms

Glass vial that held Margaret Keenan’s first Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, 7th December 2020 (glass vial)

I have been ignoring Robert Malone and his claims that he “invented” the mRNA vaccines. I just thought he would disappear, but now he’s like the other quacks in the COVID-19 vaccine world, spreading misinformation and disinformation about mRNA vaccines.

He’s become the go-to talking head to discredit the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna. And he uses his claim that he “invented” the vaccine to become the false authority on the safety and effectiveness of the vaccines. All over the internet, I’m reading COVID-19 vaccine deniers invoke his name as proof that no one should get that vaccine.

Well, I’ve reached my maximum level of annoyance at Robert Malone, so it’s time for the old feathered non-avian dinosaur to tell you what he did with the mRNA vaccines and why he should be ignored.

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RSV vaccine candidates are entering phase 3 trials — stopping a dangerous disease

rsv vaccine

A respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine has been a goal for researchers for a long time, given the serious outcomes of an RSV infection. According to the CDC, an RSV vaccine could dramatically reduce hospital and intensive-care admissions, especially for children and seniors.

A series of clinical trials tested a vaccine made from inactivated RSV in children in the 1960s. Unfortunately, the vaccine candidate worsened the disease in children when they were later naturally infected with RSV.

However, these new vaccines have shown good safety and effectiveness results in clinical trials. This article will review what RSV is and the list of vaccine candidates that are entering or are in phase 3 clinical trials.

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Court dismisses Gardasil harms claims against Merck

man in black holding phone

This article about a court dismissing Gardasil harms claims against Merck was written by Dorit Rubinstein Reiss, Professor of Law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law (San Francisco, CA), who is a frequent contributor to this and many other blogs, providing in-depth, and intellectually stimulating, articles about vaccines, medical issues, social policy, and the law.

Professor Reiss writes extensively in law journals about the social and legal policies of vaccination. Additionally, Reiss is also a member of the Parent Advisory Board of Voices for Vaccines, a parent-led organization that supports and advocates for on-time vaccination and the reduction of vaccine-preventable disease. She is also a member of the Vaccines Working Group on Ethics and Policy.

On March 15, 2022, a federal judge in Connecticut dismissed a tort claim brought against Merck by a young woman, Korrine Herlth, who alleged that the Gardasil vaccine caused her harm, including Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (“POTS”) and chronic fatigue syndrome (“CFS”).

The claim was dismissed on the grounds that federal law preempted most of the torts claims – they could not be brought because the Food, Drugs and Cosmetics Act said that federal law ruled these issues, not state torts law – and the others were dismissed because the plaintiffs’ claims were too general and did not provide sufficient grounds. The claims were dismissed without prejudice, so if the plaintiff – through her lawyers – can correct the problems the court identified, she can refile some of them. 

The case never reached the causation problems in the claim – causation problems that derive from the fact that multiple large studies found no link between HPV vaccines and the alleged harms. Nor did it actually get to examine the validity of the specific claims, but many of them draw directly from anti-vaccines claims that are highly problematic.

It is likely fair to say that in this case – and the other similar claims the law firm bringing the case, Baum, Hedlund, Aristel & Goldman is bringing alleging harms from Gardasil – the law firm is serving the anti-vaccine movement more than the individual plaintiffs, even if the law firm itself is not, as a whole, anti-vaccine. 

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