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The bivalent COVID vaccines are not linked to strokes

The anti-vaccine world has jumped on some safety signals that seem to indicate that the bivalent COVID vaccines are linked to strokes. This group has shown how it misuses preliminary data to try to make false claims about every vaccine, especially the COVID-19 vaccines. This leads to false claims about these vaccines.

This post is going to examine what was found on VAERS, what is a safety signal, and what the FDA and CDC did to determine that there was no link between the bivalent COVID-19 vaccines and stroke. Even though this link has been dismissed, you just know that the anti-vaccine world will push it for the next few months.

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flu COVID-19 mRNA vaccine

Combination flu and COVID mRNA vaccine starting clinical trials

Pfizer and BioNTech have announced the start of a phase 1 clinical trial for a new mRNA vaccine that prevents both the flu and COVID-19. The new vaccine targets these two severe respiratory diseases with one jab.

Although during the past three years we have focused on the COVID-19 pandemic, the seasonal flu is also a dangerous disease. During the 2019-2020 flu season, the last one before COVID-19 mitigation efforts reduced the risk of flu, 390,000 Americans were hospitalized from the flu. And over 25,000 died.

So, a new mRNA vaccine (with all of its advantages to tailor the vaccine to the key antigens on the virus) that combines both flu and COVID-19 can be an effective weapon against these two diseases. In a couple of years, if all goes well, we will be able to get a season flu-COVID-19 mRNA vaccine that has been manufactured for the season’s prevalent variants of both diseases.

Let’s take a look at what we know about this new vaccine and the phase 1 clinical trial.

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respiratory syncytial virus

Respiratory syncytial virus, flu, and COVID-19 — the “tripledemic”

I rarely write about the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), but the number of people infected by the virus, especially children, is leading to a fear of a tripledemic that includes RSV, the seasonal flu, and our constant nemesis, COVID-19. I guess this is the time I start writing more about the respiratory syncytial virus because everyone needs to be aware of this infectious disease.

This post will review what respiratory syncytial virus is, why it is so dangerous to children and seniors, and whether a vaccine is available.

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XBB variant

New XBB variant of COVID-19 — bivalent booster vaccine works

Here we go with a new, kind of scary version of COVID-19 — the XBB variant, which is just one of several variants that are spreading across the world. I think we’ve heard and read about so many variants over the past two and a half years that it might appear to be background noise.

But the new XBB variant probably shouldn’t be ignored — it spreads faster and seems to evade the immune system. These two issues alone can become problematic as we enter the winter months.

This article will look at this variant (though I’m just picking on one out of dozens that appear to be circulating) because XBB seems to be a bit more virulent than others. But there’s good news too — the new bivalent COVID-19 vaccine boosters from Pfizer and Moderna appear to protect against the new variant.

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Pfizer lyme disease vaccine

Pfizer-Valneva Lyme disease vaccine to start phase 3 clinical trials

We have some good news today, the Valneva Lyme disease vaccine, which will be distributed by Pfizer, is going to commence phase 3 clinical trials in the USA and Europe. For those of you who live in areas where Lyme disease is endemic, I’m sure you can’t wait.

This article will quickly review Lyme disease, the new vaccine, and how you might be able to volunteer for the clinical trials. Yes, you might be able to volunteer for the phase 3 clinical trials.

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pexels-photo-5878514.jpeg

Brook Jackson False Claims lawsuit against Ventavia COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial

This article about the Brook Jackson lawsuit claiming false payment claims for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine was written by Dorit Rubinstein Reiss, Professor of Law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law (San Francisco, CA), who is a frequent contributor to this and many other blogs, providing in-depth, and intellectually stimulating, articles about vaccines, medical issues, social policy, and the law.

Professor Reiss writes extensively in law journals about vaccination’s social and legal policies. Additionally, Reiss is also a member of the Parent Advisory Board of Voices for Vaccines, a parent-led organization that supports and advocates for on-time vaccination and the reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases. She is also a member of the Vaccines Working Group on Ethics and Policy.

Brook Jackson worked as an operator of three of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials sites for 18 days. Based on what she saw, she brought suit against the operator – Ventavia, the company that hired clinical trials site operators, ICON PLC., and Pfizer in the name of the United States under the False Claims Act. Jackson’s lawsuit claims, if true, may show that Ventavia had many issues in running the trial.

But they do not show fraud in relation to claims of payment from the federal government, which is the heart of a False Claims claim, and that alone should probably lead to her lawsuit being dismissed. The False Claims Act is not a catch-all tool for violation of FDA regulations. 

Again, even if true, they do not show a problem with Pfizer’s vaccine, a vaccine for which there is now extensive independent data on safety and effectiveness. 

Read More »Brook Jackson False Claims lawsuit against Ventavia COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial
close up view of a vaccine vial

Brook Jackson False Claims lawsuit against Ventavia COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial

This article about the Brook Jackson lawsuit claiming false payment claims for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine was written by Dorit Rubinstein Reiss, Professor of Law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law (San Francisco, CA), who is a frequent contributor to this and many other blogs, providing in-depth, and intellectually stimulating, articles about vaccines, medical issues, social policy, and the law.

Professor Reiss writes extensively in law journals about vaccination’s social and legal policies. Additionally, Reiss is also a member of the Parent Advisory Board of Voices for Vaccines, a parent-led organization that supports and advocates for on-time vaccination and the reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases. She is also a member of the Vaccines Working Group on Ethics and Policy.

Brook Jackson worked as an operator of three of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials sites for 18 days. Based on what she saw, she brought suit against the operator – Ventavia, the company that hired clinical trials site operators, ICON PLC., and Pfizer in the name of the United States under the False Claims Act. Jackson’s lawsuit claims, if true, may show that Ventavia had many issues in running the trial.

But they do not show fraud in relation to claims of payment from the federal government, which is the heart of a False Claims claim, and that alone should probably lead to her lawsuit being dismissed. The False Claims Act is not a catch-all tool for violation of FDA regulations. 

Again, even if true, they do not show a problem with Pfizer’s vaccine, a vaccine for which there is now extensive independent data on safety and effectiveness. 

Read More »Brook Jackson False Claims lawsuit against Ventavia COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial
second COVID-19 vaccine booster

Second COVID vaccine booster now or wait for the new vaccine?

Someone asked me the other day whether she should get the extremely safe second COVID-19 vaccine booster now or wait for the new Omicron-adapted vaccines that are coming in the fall from Pfizer and Moderna. I didn’t know the answer, so I thought I would investigate. Maybe it will help you or someone you know with that decision too.

The actual answer is a bit complicated, but there appear to be some good, solid recommendations coming from people who are experts in containing this pandemic. Let’s take a look.

By the way, this old dinosaur got his first Moderna booster in October 2021 and received his second booster (this time Pfizer) in April 2022. I do practice what I rant about here!

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COVID-19 flu vaccines

Combined flu and COVID vaccines associated with mild reactions

A new study examined the incidence of mild reactions after individuals have received the flu and COVID-19 vaccines at the same time. The researchers did not find anything to be of concern, but I always like to get ahead of a story and discuss it so I (and you) are prepared to deal with the inevitable anti-vaccine meme or trope.

Since COVID-19 cases will probably be increasing this fall (in fact, it’s already increasing), we will probably need another booster this fall. And that’s about the time most of us get our flu shot, so researchers wanted to know if there were any issues when getting both the flu and COVID-19 vaccines. Spoiler alert — not really.

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COVID-19 vaccine facts

COVID-19 vaccine facts and debunking myths — the semi-complete list

There are so many myths about the COVID-19 vaccine, I wanted to post some facts about the new vaccines which we can use for debunking purposes. I used to think that the HPV vaccine brought the most hatred and misinformation from the anti-vaccine world, but it’s clear that the new COVID-19 vaccines are their new targets.

This article will only focus on the five vaccines that I believe will eventually receive FDA or European Medicines Agency (EMA) approval – Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson (JNJ Janssen), and Novavax vaccines. I remain unconvinced that any vaccine made in China or the Russian Sputnik V vaccine will ever get approved by countries with robust drug regulatory agencies. However, if they are, I will certainly add them to a future iteration of this list.

I’m going to make this in a basic chart form for ease of use in finding COVID-19 vaccine facts and myths. I will link to supporting evidence wherever relevant.

Read More »COVID-19 vaccine facts and debunking myths — the semi-complete list