My vaccine credo

I find it tiresome to repeat myself, repeatedly over and over, about the key points of vaccines. So, I decided to write out my Vaccine Credo.

What’s a credo? Well, it’s a “any formal or authorized statement of beliefs, principles, or opinions.” Since, everything I state is supported by evidence, I’m just going to call this my Formal Statement of the Principles of Vaccines.

Vaccines Save Lives

  1. Vaccines are safe.
  2. Vaccines prevent a wide range of infectious diseases.
  3. Vaccines save the lives of 42,000 people every year in the USA.
  4. These vaccine-preventable infectious diseases cause great harm to children and adults. They increase rates of hospitalization. They kill innocent people. They are not inconsequential.
  5. The safety and effectiveness of vaccines are established by evidence published in the top medical and scientific journals in the world.
  6. The consensus of medical and scientific opinion is that they are safe and effective.
  7. Vaccines do not cause autism or other neurodevelopmental conditions.
  8. Vaccines help improve fetal outcome in pregnant mothers.
  9. The safest and most effective way to protect children’s lives is following the vaccine schedules set by public health agencies like the CDC.
  10. There is no debate about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines–those who are opposed to vaccines are either ignorant of the scientific facts or are intentionally deceitful.
  11. Not vaccinating children places other children at risk–especially ones who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons or children too young to be vaccinated.
  12. Children can get vaccines for free in the USA, no matter if they have health insurance or not. This is a right for American children, and all countries in the world should do the same.
  13. Those parents who do not vaccinate their children selfishly hide behind the herd effect–while sanctimoniously stating that we don’t have to worry about these vaccine-preventable diseases.
  14. Parents who refuse to vaccinate their children are self-centered and egocentric–putting their children intentionally in harm’s way.

vaccines-33000My Vaccine Credo may not exactly roll off the tongue. It probably is not easy to memorize. But all 14 points are supported by the vast mountains of scientific evidence not cherry picking here and there. It is based on my 35 years of scientific education and experience. It is based on the best opinions from the best physicians and scientists who focus their lives on vaccines.

All else are just inventions of ignorant and uneducated minds. Those people mean nothing to me. But let’s try to save their children, because vaccines do save lives.

 

Why we vaccinate–debunking flu vaccine myths in 25 easy steps

flu-shot-mythThe seasonal flu is associated with an estimated 54,000 to 430,000 hospitalizations and approximately 3,000 to 49,000 deaths annually in the USA. So anyone who thinks that the flu isn’t a serious disease, needs to look at those numbers again. People die. And not just the old or sick–healthy people and children are killed by the flu. And let’s not forget about more serious pandemics, like H1N1, that can kill many more people.

We’ve all heard the excuses and myths about the flu vaccines. They’re repeated over and over again not only by those who are vaccine deniers, but more often by average people who just refuse to get the vaccine. This week, a fellow blogger and someone whom I’ve gotten to know over the past couple of years, Tara Haelle, spent numerous hours putting together the Top 25 Myths about the flu vaccine, which she published here. Read it. Please. 

So, below is her list of 25 myths about the flu vaccine, with links back to her article (and in some cases, to this blog too) that debunk the myth. After you read this, share it with everyone. Your neighbor who won’t get the flu vaccine. Your spouse. Your parents. Your coworker. And one more person–yourself. Continue reading “Why we vaccinate–debunking flu vaccine myths in 25 easy steps”

Flu during pregnancy linked with increased risk of autism

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) appear to be an increasing medical issue in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ASD is diagnosed in approximately 1 in 88 children, and are reported to occur in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. ASD refers to a broad range of symptoms, from mild social awkwardness to mental retardation, repetitive behaviors and an inability to communicate. The CDC states that diagnosing ASD can be difficult, because there are no medical tests, such as a genetic or blood test, that can provide a definitive diagnosis. Physicians make a diagnosis through observation of a child’s behavior and development.

Medical science agrees that the increase in diagnosis is not only a result of better diagnostic standards, but also because there appears to be more children who are actually developing autism. Unfortunately, science has not uncovered the cause. Genetics are a critical factor, for example, since it has been shown that if one twin has autism there is a high likelihood that the other twin will also develop ASD. But are there other factors?

Continue reading “Flu during pregnancy linked with increased risk of autism”

CDC recommends pertussis vaccination for all pregnant women

On October 24, 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that “providers of prenatal care implement a Tdap immunization (Tdap or DTaP vaccine) program for all pregnant women.  Health-care personnel should administer a dose of Tdap during each pregnancy irrespective of the patient’s prior history of receiving Tdap.  If not administered during pregnancy, Tdap should be administered immediately postpartum.” This recommendation is based upon the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), a group of medical and public health experts that develops recommendations on how to use vaccines to control diseases in the United States, guidelines, published Fall 2011, for whooping cough(Bordetella pertussis).

ACIP reviewed published and unpublished data from VAERS, Sanofi Pasteur (Adacel) and GlaxoSmithKline (Boostrix) pregnancy registries, and two small studies here and here. ACIP concluded “that available data from these studies did not suggest any elevated frequency or unusual patterns of adverse events in pregnant women who received Tdap and that the few serious adverse events reported were unlikely to have been caused by the vaccine.” In addition, both  tetanus and diphtheria toxoids (together) and tetanus toxoid (alone) vaccines have been used worldwide in pregnant women to prevent neonatal tetanus without negative effects. The ACIP concluded that administration of the pertussis vaccine after 20 weeks of pregnancy was preferred to minimize any risk of a low percentage adverse event.

According to the CDC, only about 3% of pregnant women receive the vaccination. However, the CDC believes if the new recommendations are implemented, there would be a 33 percent reduction in cases, a 38 percent reduction in hospitalizations and a 49 percent reduction in deaths from whooping cough.

Vaccines Saves Lives.

Use the Science-based Vaccine Search Engine.

Key citations:

Disappointing 2011 flu vaccination rates

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently published a comprehensive analysis of influenza vaccination rates of the US population during the 2011-2012 season. Mostly, the numbers continue to be disappointing, even in groups that should have higher rates of flu shots, such as pregnant women and healthcare workers. These numbers continue to demonstrate the difficulty in increasing the vaccine uptake rate in the US.

Public health officials has been pushing to increase the flu vaccination rates of healthcare workers. The numbers are somewhat disappointing, but as more states mandate flu vaccinations for healthcare workers, the rate may improve. The CDC found that about 63.4% of healthcare workers had been vaccinated for the flu as of November 2011, an 8 point improvement over 2010. 

But, according to a report in NBC News, “the group that should have 100 percent vaccination is health care workers. The CDC data show that more than 86 percent of physicians are vaccinated, followed by more than three-quarters of nurses. But the numbers plummet to just half of workers in long-term care facilities, where patients are especially vulnerable to flu.” Continue reading “Disappointing 2011 flu vaccination rates”

Flu shots are safe for pregnant women

Not that it was required, but there’s even more evidence that flu shots are safe and efficacious for pregnant women, neonates and fetuses. A study published recently in Obstetrics & GynecologyEffect of influenza vaccination in the first trimester of pregnancy, investigated the effects of influenza vaccinations on fetal and neonatal outcomes. 

Over a 5 year study period, a total of 8,690 women received a seasonal trivalent inactive influenza vaccine during the first trimester, and delivered babies at the study institution. Some of the key results were:

  • Women vaccinated during pregnancy were significantly older with more pregnancies than women who declined vaccination.
  • About 2 percent had a baby with a major birth defect, such as a malformation in the heart or a cleft lip, identical to the rate among almost 77,000 pregnant women who did not get the vaccine.
  • Women who were vaccinated had lower stillbirth (0.3% compared with 0.6%, P=.006).
  • Women who were vaccinated had lower neonatal death (0.2% compared with 0.4%, P=.01).
  • Women who were vaccinated had lower premature delivery rates (5% compared with 6%, P=.004). Continue reading “Flu shots are safe for pregnant women”

Anti-vaccine lunatic proud to spread infection to unsuspecting children

That is a screen shot from a Facebook posting on July 14, 2012 where a mother describes how she took her child, infected with chickenpox (Varicella zoster), to a baseball game. And she bragged how she probably infected others (probably most were vaccinated, which indicates he level of understanding of immunizations). She was so proud of attempting to infect others with her son’s chickenpox that she had to tell everyone about it. The stupidity of her actions were beyond comprehension by me. Continue reading “Anti-vaccine lunatic proud to spread infection to unsuspecting children”