Skip to content
Home » Pseudoscience

Pseudoscience

Robert F. Kennedy Jr had a brain-eating worm – that makes sense

Recent revelations about Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s health during a 2010 memory loss and mental fogginess diagnosis have surfaced, indicating a pork tapeworm larva as the potential cause, rather than a brain tumor. This unexpected diagnosis was based on scans that showed a likely dead parasite cyst, thought to be from ingesting undercooked pork. Despite his anti-vaccine stance possibly seeming less incongruent with his acknowledgment of climate change science, the irony deepens as Kennedy maintains he is healthier than his presidential contenders, despite having other health conditions like atrial fibrillation.

cancer cures

Cancer cures and alternative medicine — not much here

The content discusses the ineffectiveness and dangers of alternative medicine in treating cancer, emphasizing that such “cures” are not backed by scientific evidence and often provide false hope. A significant study highlighted in JAMA Oncology demonstrated that patients opting for alternative treatments had poorer survival rates compared to those undergoing evidence-based cancer therapies. The post iterates that genuine cancer treatments are based on robust scientific research and are continually improving, contributing to the ongoing decline in cancer mortality rates. Alternative medicine is critiqued for exploiting patient fears and showing no real efficacy in curing cancer, emphasizing the importance of adhering to scientifically validated treatments.

anti-vaccine claims

Refuting a list of anti-vaccine claims and tropes once again

Anti-vaccine claims continue to circulate despite clear refutation with evidence and legal facts. Vaccination programs offer a clear route to compensation for rare adverse events, and vaccines, including the hepatitis B vaccine, remain critical for preventing serious diseases. Ingredients in vaccines are present in safe, low doses, and the rigorous testing standards, such as double-blind placebo studies, ensure vaccine safety and effectiveness. Herd immunity protects against disease spread, which is wrongly attributed to the presence of unvaccinated individuals. Mandatory vaccinations in many countries confirm the global acceptance of vaccines’ health benefits, contrasting with unfounded anti-vaccine allegations.

vax-unvax

Debunking RFK Jr and Brian Hooker’s book “Vax-Unvax” – Part 4

In the final part of a series, Dr. Frank Han debunks myths from “Vax-Unvax: Let the Science Speak,” addressing false links between vaccines and diseases like IBD, autism, and intussusception. He exposes the authors’ cherry-picking and incorrect conclusions, while highlighting science’s commitment to truth, citing extensive studies showing no evidence supporting these claimed associations.

vax-unvax

Debunking RFK Jr and Brian Hooker’s book “Vax-Unvax” – Part 3

Part 3 of Frank Han’s series critiques “Vax-Unvax” focusing on Thimerosal, a vaccine preservative. Debunking claims of its adverse effects, Han explains its historical use, the lack of evidence linking it to autism, and its subsequent removal from vaccines except for the multi-dose flu vaccine, which has a preservative-free option. Han emphasizes the scientific illiteracy of the authors and the increasing autism diagnoses following Thimerosal’s removal.

Debunking RFK Jr and Brian Hooker’s book “Vax-Unvax” – Part 2

Dr. Frank Han critiques part 2 of “Vax-Unvax,” highlighting flawed studies and statistical errors in the book’s arguments against vaccination. He emphasizes the inadequacy of research methods used in the cited studies and the misrepresentation of facts by anti-vaccination advocates. The article underlines the importance of adhering to scientific standards and the benefits of vaccinations as evidenced by established medical research.

person holding three syringes with medicine

Debunking of RFK Jr and Brian Hooker’s book “Vax-Unvax” – Part 1

In part 1 of his series, pediatric cardiologist Frank Han refutes allegations from the anti-vax book “Vax-Unvax.” Han criticizes the book for fearmongering and recycling discredited arguments without genuine interest in vaccine safety. He reveals that numerous studies already demonstrate vaccine safety and efficacy, contrary to the book’s claims. He also dissects the book’s misuse of statistical fallacies and highlights the danger of decreased vaccination rates through outbreaks of preventable diseases. Moreover, Han emphasizes that vaccines have been rigorously tested and proven not to cause autism or other conditions as claimed by anti-vax proponents.

Do supplements prevent cancer or heart disease

Do supplements prevent cancer or heart disease? No evidence

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) found insufficient evidence to recommend supplements for cancer and heart disease prevention, except for cases with specific medical needs. Expensive supplements generally result in “very expensive urine,” with no benefit for those without nutrient deficiencies. The USPSTF’s evaluations, which influence healthcare coverages, are based on high-quality clinical studies, leaving most supplements without support for their claimed benefits.

vitamin D cancer

Vitamin D supplements do not prevent cancer

Claims about vitamin D supplements preventing or curing cancer are greatly exaggerated. Most research, typically in cell culture or animal models, fails to translate into clinical relevance. Large studies have found no link between vitamin D and reduced cancer incidence or improved cancer outcomes. Though essential in regulated amounts, excess vitamin D is toxic, and its synthesis is a response to sunlight, limiting the benefits and posing skin cancer risks. Individuals diagnosed with deficiencies should follow medical advice but not expect miraculous cancer prevention.

person holding injection anti-vaxxer

How to Ignore Science and Risk Your Health – Anti-Vaxxer Guide

This satirical article mocks anti-vax attitudes, presenting a “guide” for rejecting vaccines by dismissing scientific consensus, ignoring evidence, discrediting experts, and spreading misinformation. It sarcastically lists supposed “benefits” of anti-vaxx beliefs, like getting sick from preventable diseases and facing social ostracism, ultimately aiming to expose the flaws in anti-vaccine logic.