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Greenpeace blocks golden rice for children of the Philippines

Greenpeace successfully blocked the cultivation of golden rice in the Philippines, a genetically modified crop designed to combat vitamin A deficiency, which kills millions of children in impoverished areas. Despite extensive scientific evidence proving the safety and efficiency of golden rice, Greenpeace’s campaign leverages pseudoscience, ignoring its potential to save lives in vulnerable communities.

an artist s illustration of artificial intelligence ai this image depicts how ai could assist in genomic studies and its applications it was created by artist nidia dias as part of the

DNA in food or vaccines is not going to change your genes

A poll revealed widespread fear of DNA in food and vaccines, leading to calls for mandatory labeling. This pervasive pseudoscience myth suggests that consuming or injecting DNA can alter human genetics. However, DNA from food and vaccines is broken down and does not integrate into human genes. Education on DNA biochemistry counters these fears, explaining that DNA and its four nucleobases (CGAT) are consistent across all life forms, simply coding for proteins. Massive studies on animals fed GMOs and vaccinated humans illustrate no adverse effects from DNA consumption or vaccine administration. Such concerns are scientifically unfounded; eating GMO foods or getting vaccines does not alter or harm one’s DNA.

science mistakes

Science mistakes — the favorite trope of the anti-vaccine world

Those people who disagree with science love to remind us that science makes mistakes. I keep observing this same ridiculous, illogical argument being used by all of the science deniers, repeating various “science mistakes” tropes as if it is all the evidence they need to refute scientific claims. Honestly, I think the pseudoscience pushers meet annually in Sedona, Arizona, ground zero of woo, to discuss which trope they’re pushing each year.

The anti-vaccine zealots, creationists, anthropogenic global warming deniers, and whomever else pretends to use science to actually deny science frequently focus on this theme of “science mistakes.”  And then they produce a list of cherry-picked examples that “prove” that science is wrong (see Note 1). Of course, this indicates more of a misunderstanding of what is science and the history of science than it is a condemnation of science. But your typical science denier is probably not going to let facts get in the way of maintaining faith in their beliefs. So let’s deconstruct and discredit this “science mistakes” trope.

By the way, in my story, I admit that there are many “science mistakes,” so read on. Hopefully, it’s somewhat enlightening.

Read More »Science mistakes — the favorite trope of the anti-vaccine world