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COVID vaccination

COVID vaccination lowers cardiovascular and stroke risk

Recent studies confirm COVID-19 vaccination significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular events like heart attacks and strokes. A Korean study showed a 58% decrease in such risks post-vaccination, corroborating similar findings from previous U.S. research. The evidence is clear: vaccinations are crucial in preventing severe post-COVID complications and saving lives.

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Bivalent COVID vaccines are not linked to stroke — new research

Recent research shows that bivalent mRNA COVID vaccines do not increase stroke risk, a claim previously unverified large-scale studies. The paper in JAMA examined 5.4 million records, finding no significant stroke risk after COVID vaccines but indicated risks associated with flu vaccines, contradicting most prior research. Further analysis is called for to resolve confusion.

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COVID vaccines and prion disease — zombie trope debunked

For over two decades, various discredited anti-vaccine claims have reemerged, such as the assertion that COVID vaccines lead to prion diseases. Prion diseases, several of which exist, are always fatal and typically result from misfolded proteins. Despite concerns during the UK mad cow disease outbreak, no evidence links vaccines to an increased incidence of prion diseases. Recently, anti-vaccine proponents have misinterpreted data to suggest a link between mRNA COVID vaccines and prion diseases, yet no biologically plausible mechanism supports this. Vaccination data shows no increase in prion diseases, reinforcing the safety of COVID vaccines.

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COVID vaccines are safe — that’s the science

In an evidence-based discussion, the author stresses that COVID vaccines are safe and the risks, though real, are minor and rare. Citing experts, large studies, and CDC assurances, they argue vaccine benefits far outweigh the risks. Anti-vaccine claims are dismissed as lacking evidence and relying on logical fallacies. The author concludes affirming the significant benefits and minor risks of COVID vaccines.

covid-19 vaccines effectiveness

Updated COVID-19 vaccines have high effectiveness

Recent research indicates that updated COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective against severe results like emergency room visits and hospitalizations among adults. Despite Omicron variants circulating, those vaccinated are significantly less likely to need medical attention if infected. Data underscores the importance of receiving the latest COVID vaccine for protection.

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COVID misinformation campaigns are very profitable

A Washington Post report reveals that anti-vaccine groups profited from COVID-19 misinformation, raising over $118 million from 2020 to 2022. Pre-pandemic revenue was dwarfed as groups like Children’s Health Defense and ICAN increased fundraising efforts and salaries for executives like RFK Jr and Del Bigtree. These organizations have promoted false narratives about COVID-19 vaccines and unsupported treatments, such as ivermectin, posing public health risks and undermining vaccine mandates for children’s diseases.

COVID-19 vaccines safety

The largest safety study of COVID vaccines finds rare issues

A comprehensive study involving over 99 million vaccinated individuals indicated a slight increase in neurological, blood, and heart-related conditions following COVID-19 vaccination. However, the adverse events were very rare, and the vaccines’ ability to prevent severe COVID-19 far outweighs these risks. The research, drawing from extensive medical records, demonstrates the vaccines’ safety and efficacy, reiterating the importance of vaccination despite the infrequent side effects.

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NFL star Travis Kelce posts a heart photo — anti-vaxxers go crazy

NFL star Travis Kelce, tagged “Mr. Pfizer,” came under anti-vaccine fire for an Instagram post where he made a heart shape with his hands, sparking baseless claims of vaccine dangers. Contrary to myths, COVID-19 vaccines have a much lower myocarditis risk than the virus itself, and other heart issues aren’t linked to the vaccine. The American Heart Association endorses vaccines, especially for those with heart conditions. Kelce’s gesture likely celebrated the Super Bowl win or expressed love, not a vaccine warning.

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Do COVID mRNA vaccines affect menstrual cycles?

Studies show mRNA COVID-19 vaccines can cause small, temporary changes in menstrual cycles, less so than the disease itself. In one research, vaccinated women experienced a minor increase in cycle length that normalized the following month. Another study linked the vaccine to a short-term risk of heavy menstrual bleeding. Despite these effects, the benefits of vaccination against COVID-19 outweigh these temporary menstrual changes.