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vax-unvax

Debunking RFK Jr and Brian Hooker’s book “Vax-Unvax” – Part 3


Part 3 of Frank Han’s series critiques “Vax-Unvax” focusing on Thimerosal, a vaccine preservative. Debunking claims of its adverse effects, Han explains its historical use, the lack of evidence linking it to autism, and its subsequent removal from vaccines except for the multi-dose flu vaccine, which has a preservative-free option. Han emphasizes the scientific illiteracy of the authors and the increasing autism diagnoses following Thimerosal’s removal.


Debunking RFK Jr and Brian Hooker’s book “Vax-Unvax” – Part 2


Dr. Frank Han critiques part 2 of “Vax-Unvax,” highlighting flawed studies and statistical errors in the book’s arguments against vaccination. He emphasizes the inadequacy of research methods used in the cited studies and the misrepresentation of facts by anti-vaccination advocates. The article underlines the importance of adhering to scientific standards and the benefits of vaccinations as evidenced by established medical research.


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Bird flu outbreaks — what are the scientific facts


An emerging bird flu outbreak involves the H5N1 subtype, with the potential of infecting humans. Currently, 48 states reported outbreaks in birds, but only two human cases, one mild, were confirmed. While there’s no immediate concern for a pandemic, health authorities remain vigilant, and vaccines are available. The press may be reacting strongly to the situation.


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Debunking of RFK Jr and Brian Hooker’s book “Vax-Unvax” – Part 1


In part 1 of his series, pediatric cardiologist Frank Han refutes allegations from the anti-vax book “Vax-Unvax.” Han criticizes the book for fearmongering and recycling discredited arguments without genuine interest in vaccine safety. He reveals that numerous studies already demonstrate vaccine safety and efficacy, contrary to the book’s claims. He also dissects the book’s misuse of statistical fallacies and highlights the danger of decreased vaccination rates through outbreaks of preventable diseases. Moreover, Han emphasizes that vaccines have been rigorously tested and proven not to cause autism or other conditions as claimed by anti-vax proponents.


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Judge in Gardasil lawsuit throws out most claims


Dorit Rubinstein Reiss, a law professor and vaccination policy expert, discusses a federal judge’s recent decision in the Gardasil lawsuit, which barred several claims against Merck as preempted by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act but permitted discovery to proceed on claims involving failure to warn the plaintiffs’ doctors and fraudulent concealment. This pivotal ruling reduced the scope of the plaintiffs’ cases, originally marked by broad allegations, to more specific claims of deficient warnings to healthcare providers and concealed risks, despite substantial evidence against the alleged harms of the HPV vaccine.


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The three biggest risk factors for dementia


Researchers have identified modifiable factors like diabetes, air pollution, and alcohol as significantly increasing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease risks. Additionally, genetic factors affecting brain regions were noted, although they cannot be modified. The study emphasizes the complexity of these diseases and suggests healthy diet, active lifestyle, and social interaction as potential risk mitigators.


close up photo of sugar cubes in glass jar

Does sugar cause cancer? Another dumb myth to be debunked


Despite the widespread belief that sugar may cause cancer, there is no strong clinical evidence to support this link. While some research, like a 2017 Nature Communications paper, suggests a connection, these findings are inconclusive and don’t constitute a general claim that sugar causes cancer. Cancer is a complex disease with over 200 types, each with different causes. Lifestyle changes, like avoiding smoking and maintaining a healthy diet, can reduce cancer risk. However, the Warburg effect posits that cancer could have a unique sugar metabolism, which presents a potential research avenue for treatments. It’s important to manage sugar intake for other health reasons, but currently, sugar avoidance is not proven to prevent or treat cancer.


covid vaccines DNA

DNA fragments in COVID vaccines aren’t linked to cancer


     2   5  7SharesFlorida Surgeon General, Joseph Ladapo, MD, Ph.D., has continued to claim That COVID vaccines may be contaminated with DNA that can lead to various health issues like cancer. I have debunked this, but still, more and more anti-vaccine activists push… Read More »DNA fragments in COVID vaccines aren’t linked to cancer


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Severe COVID linked to risk of neurologic and psychiatric disorders


Recent research indicates that people who have been hospitalized with severe COVID-19 face a doubled risk of psychiatric or neurologic disorders one year post-infection compared to those never infected. This contrasts with mild COVID cases, which show no increased risk or even reduced risk when compared to non-COVID individuals. This evidence underscores COVID’s long-term impact on mental health, highlighting the importance of vaccines in preventing severe disease outcomes.


Do supplements prevent cancer or heart disease

Do supplements prevent cancer or heart disease? No evidence


The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) found insufficient evidence to recommend supplements for cancer and heart disease prevention, except for cases with specific medical needs. Expensive supplements generally result in “very expensive urine,” with no benefit for those without nutrient deficiencies. The USPSTF’s evaluations, which influence healthcare coverages, are based on high-quality clinical studies, leaving most supplements without support for their claimed benefits.