ACIP vaccine recommendations – updates for HPV, HepA, MenB, flu

vaccine recommendations

On 26-27 June 2019, the CDC’s Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) updated vaccine recommendations for several vaccines including the human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis A (HepA), and serogroup B meningococcal disease (MenB). These vaccine recommendations do not become official until they are published in the CDC’s peer-reviewed journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)

This article will review the ACIP process and new recommendations. Continue reading “ACIP vaccine recommendations – updates for HPV, HepA, MenB, flu”

California SB276 – legislation to reduce vaccine medical exemption abuse

sb276

On 20 June 2019, after a long day of testimony on California SB276 from both sides of the mandatory vaccine issue, the assembly health committee voted 9 in favor, 2 against, and 2 abstaining to move forward with the bill which can prevent fake medical exemptions.

This post will describe the amended bill and then shortly address today’s events. Continue reading “California SB276 – legislation to reduce vaccine medical exemption abuse”

HPV prevalence drops by 86% since introduction of vaccine

hpv prevalence

Ten years after the introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in the USA in 2006, HPV prevalence has dropped significantly in a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This is very encouraging research that further strengthens the evidence behind the effectiveness of the HPV vaccine.

One of the tropes pushed by the anti-vaccine religion is that we don’t know if the vaccine actually will prevent an HPV infection after 10 years. Well, now we know. 

Let’s take a look at the study on HPV prevalence in the USA. Continue reading “HPV prevalence drops by 86% since introduction of vaccine”

February 2019 ACIP Meeting – the process for vaccine recommendations

In February 2019, I attended a meeting of the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the first time. This post describes my observations from the two-day ACIP meeting process.

Generally, the meeting taught me that the process the committee goes through is highly deliberative, data-intensive, and the committee pays close attention to safety and maximizing benefits. Though no process is perfect, the meeting increased my confidence in the decision-making process behind the vaccines recommendations that apply to my children.

Numerous anti-vaccine group attended added some excitement and some stress, but was, from a standpoint of vaccine policy-making, largely irrelevant. 

I am initially, a public administration scholar – I wrote my dissertation on agency accountability, taught the Federal Advisory Committee Act multiple times, and teach almost annually about agency decision making. This made me very interested in the committee’s process. I also knew in advance that there will be – as there has been in several previous meeting – numerous anti-vaccine activists, and was curious to see their interaction with the meeting in reality.

Initially, I thought I would describe in detail what was addressed in the meeting, but I think that would make this post too long. For those who are interested, here is the agenda for the February 2019 ACIP meeting (pdf).

Instead, I will offer my observations about the process. I will mention that the only things voted on in this meeting were related to Japanese encephalitis vaccine and anthrax vaccine. The committee voted to make some changes to the language of the recommendation of the Japanese encephalitis vaccine for travelers to clarify it, but not changes to the actual recommendation, changes to the timeline for adult priming series (the initial vaccine series) from a 28-day interval to an interval that can span 7-28 days, and expanding the age for recommending a booster for children and putting that recommendation on equal footing to the recommendation for an adult booster.

With respect to anthrax vaccines, the committee recommended giving a booster dose to high-risk people (like first responders) who are not currently exposed but may be at risk of exposure, if they want it.

Everything else discussed was informational – some of it as part of the process of preparing for future votes (Like whether to extend the recommendation for HPV vaccines to include those 26-45), some of it as part of ongoing monitoring (like the examination of flu vaccines’ data). Continue reading “February 2019 ACIP Meeting – the process for vaccine recommendations”

Meningococcal vaccine to prevent meningitis approved for 1-9 year olds

meningococcal vaccine

Well, this isn’t going to be popular with the anti-vaccine religion, since they go all in with the old “too many, too soon” trope which says that our children get way too many vaccines when they’re too young. Ignoring that thoroughly debunked myth, the powerful meningococcal vaccine that trains the immune system to attack the bacteria that can lead to deadly meningitis has now been approved by the FDA for 1-9-year-old children.

Let’s take a look at this vaccine and the disease it prevents, just so parents know that they can protect their children. Continue reading “Meningococcal vaccine to prevent meningitis approved for 1-9 year olds”

Another study supports the Gardasil long-term safety

Gardasil long-term safety

I’ve written more than almost 200 articles about the safety and effectiveness of various versions of the HPV vaccine. As a result, I have focused a lot of those 200 articles on Gardasil long-term safety.

There have been huge studies, one that includes over 200,000 patients and another that includes over 1 million patients, that have provided solid and nearly incontrovertible evidence that support the Gardasil long-term safety – nevertheless, the anti-vaccine tropes and memes about the HPV cancer-preventing vaccine persist.

Though it is frustrating that some researchers publish “evidence” from small studies that are poorly designed in an attempt to invent issues with HPV vaccines if you look at the best designed unbiased studies, the facts are clear–Gardasil is safe and effective. It could be one of the safest and most effective vaccines since it was developed and studied in the era of harsh, and mostly unfounded, criticisms of vaccines by certain antivaccine activists.

Continue reading “Another study supports the Gardasil long-term safety”

Mumps vaccine effectiveness – waning immunity may require 3rd dose

mumps vaccine

Over the past few years, there has been a resurgence in mumps outbreaks across the USA and other parts of the world. Although these outbreaks did not spread widely as they did before the advent of mumps vaccines, it still required some scientific research into why this happened. According to just published peer-reviewed research, much of the mumps outbreaks may result from waning mumps vaccine effectiveness.

Because I am concerned that this new article will be misinterpreted by some parts of the discussion, I’m glaring at the anti-vaccine religion, it is important that we take a very careful look at this well-done study examining what could be the root cause of some outbreaks – waning immunity to the mumps vaccine. Continue reading “Mumps vaccine effectiveness – waning immunity may require 3rd dose”

Rabies vaccine could have saved Ryker Roque – he dies needlessly

rabies vaccine

As someone who spends an inordinate amount of time reviewing stories about vaccines, I read way too many tragic ones about children dying from vaccine-preventable diseases. But a recent story, about a six-year-old boy named Ryker Roque who died from a rabies infection, was particularly sad and devastating. He could have avoided rabies, and its horrific consequences, with just a couple of better choices from his parents. If only they had used the rabies vaccine immediately, this would not be a story.

Let’s be clear – I don’t know if the parents of Ryker are anti-vaccine or not, but they made a choice about the rabies vaccine that led to their son’s death. That makes the story tragic and sad. I know his parents are incredibly distraught, and probably wish they had made better choices – but maybe their story will prevent future tragedies. I hope. Continue reading “Rabies vaccine could have saved Ryker Roque – he dies needlessly”

Hepatitis B vaccine – new recommendations for vaccinating infants

hepatitis b vaccine

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is now recommending that infants receive their first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine within 24 hours of birth. This recommendation is in line with the guidance of the CDC.

Hepatitis B is a serious disease that is easily preventible with the vaccine. Yet, the hepatitis B vaccine is one of the most vilified of the vaccines by the anti-vaccine crowd.

This article will take a look at hepatitis B, the vaccine, and some of the nonsensical claims of the anti-vaccine world. Continue reading “Hepatitis B vaccine – new recommendations for vaccinating infants”

Merck vaccine lawsuit – implausible narrative, bad law and facts

Merck vaccine lawsuit

On 19 July 2016, New York Attorney Patricia Finn filed a complaint in a federal district court against the pharmaceutical firm Merck, officials in the Department of Health and Human Services, and Julie Gerberding (formerly director of the CDC, and currently Merck’s Executive Vice President for Strategic Communications, Global Public Policy and Population Health). This Merck vaccine lawsuit, called Doe v Merck,  is an amended complaint that was filed on 20 July, and will be the one examined in this article.

While the complaint was filed in the name of a Jane Doe and Baby Doe, the text of the complaint made it very clear that Jane Doe is in fact Maria Dwyer, and Baby Doe is her son Colin Dwyer.  Colin Dwyer’s case was one of the test cases in the Omnibus Autism Proceedings (OAP) for the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP). The Dwyer case, like the other five test cases in the OAP, was rejected.

The Doe v Merck complaint makes two demands. First, that Merck’s license to produce the measles, mumps, rubella vaccine (M-M-R®II ) be revoked.

Second, it asks for damages for Colin’s alleged vaccine injuries. The complaint is problematic from three aspects:

  1. The story it tries to tell is full of holes;
  2. as a legal matter, it makes no case; and
  3. it includes many factual inaccuracies.

In short, the Merck vaccine lawsuit is bad work.  However, the complaint is being shared widely, and a discussion of its shortcomings might be of value to many readers.  Continue reading “Merck vaccine lawsuit – implausible narrative, bad law and facts”