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The three biggest risk factors for dementia

Researchers have identified modifiable factors like diabetes, air pollution, and alcohol as significantly increasing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease risks. Additionally, genetic factors affecting brain regions were noted, although they cannot be modified. The study emphasizes the complexity of these diseases and suggests healthy diet, active lifestyle, and social interaction as potential risk mitigators.

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Does drinking alcohol increase the risk of cancer?

The WHO suggests cutting alcohol lowers cancer risks, but evidence is mixed. A recent paper found limited or inadequate evidence of reduced cancer risk with lower alcohol consumption, specifically for cancers like laryngeal, colorectal, and breast cancer, while some links to oral and esophageal cancer were noted. Despite some findings, significant scientific gaps remain, and further research is needed to establish clearer connections between alcohol reduction and cancer risk.

alcohol health effects

Alcohol health effects – drinking any amount is bad, but is the science convincing?

I am fairly certain that most of the feathered dinosaur’s readers have read articles about alcohol health effects. It’s bad. It’s good. It prevents heart attacks. It causes cancer. It reduces risks of Sasquatch attacks but increases risks of alien abductions.

I know some of you are thinking that science never gets this right. Who are you to believe? An ancient feathered dinosaur? Your favorite news website? Your next door neighbor? Alien Sasquatch?

Well, there was a recent article published that employed a powerful systematic analysis of the body of published evidence surrounding alcohol health effects. Spoiler alert – drinking any amount may not be good for your health.Read More »Alcohol health effects – drinking any amount is bad, but is the science convincing?

breast cancer risk

Breast cancer risk – lifestyle choices

The myths about cancer risk are both sad and dangerous. Too many times, I read about supplements or diets that stop “cancer” as if it’s one disease (it is not) that a handful of blueberries will destroy. Like almost every cancer, reducing breast cancer risk really boils down to a handful of lifestyle choices.

In 2015, there will be 232,000 new breast cancer cases in the USA (pdf). Worldwide in 2012, it was estimated that there were over 1.7 million new cases of breast cancer. There is evidence that the rate of breast cancer is increasing, but that may be a result of better diagnostic tools that give earlier diagnoses (and this is a discussion left for another day).

Breast cancer has become a part of our culture, partially because the disease moved from a disease that was only mentioned in whispers to one that has some of the highest awareness for cancers.

Using a review article, by Max Dieterich et al.  about breast cancer risk and lifestyle influence as a template, I thought it would be prudent to list out some of the major influencers on breast cancer risk. And no, smoking weed has no known influence on the risk of breast cancer.

Read More »Breast cancer risk – lifestyle choices