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Moderna’s mRNA vaccine for RSV approved by the FDA

The FDA has approved Moderna’s mRNA vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) to prevent serious lung infections, especially in vulnerable populations like infants and older adults. Clinical trials show the vaccine is effective and safe, though concerns and skepticism from anti-vaccine advocates persist. Existing RSV vaccines also show efficacy.

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Another mRNA vaccine cancer treatment — Epstein-Barr virus

The FDA has approved an investigational new drug (IND) application for a novel mRNA therapeutic cancer vaccine, targeting Epstein-Barr virus-positive solid tumors and hematoma in adults. This vaccine, developed by WestGene Biotech, is intended for clinical trials under the name WGc-043 and is designed to enhance immune responses against specific cancer-associated antigens, potentially improving treatment outcomes. The vaccine is not yet approved for general use but is currently undergoing a phase 1 clinical trial in China.

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New mRNA vaccine for pancreatic cancer enters phase 2 trials

A new personalized mRNA vaccine for pancreatic cancer, cevumeran, has shown promise in a phase 1 trial and is advancing to a larger phase 2 trial. It works by inducing an immune response against specific antigens in each patient’s tumor, offering hope for a disease with typically poor prognosis. Developed by BioNTech, cevumeran complements standard treatments like surgery and chemotherapy, potentially increasing overall success rates.

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Do COVID mRNA vaccines affect menstrual cycles?

Studies show mRNA COVID-19 vaccines can cause small, temporary changes in menstrual cycles, less so than the disease itself. In one research, vaccinated women experienced a minor increase in cycle length that normalized the following month. Another study linked the vaccine to a short-term risk of heavy menstrual bleeding. Despite these effects, the benefits of vaccination against COVID-19 outweigh these temporary menstrual changes.

an artist s illustration of artificial intelligence ai this image depicts how ai could assist in genomic studies and its applications it was created by artist nidia dias as part of the

DNA in food or vaccines is not going to change your genes

A poll revealed widespread fear of DNA in food and vaccines, leading to calls for mandatory labeling. This pervasive pseudoscience myth suggests that consuming or injecting DNA can alter human genetics. However, DNA from food and vaccines is broken down and does not integrate into human genes. Education on DNA biochemistry counters these fears, explaining that DNA and its four nucleobases (CGAT) are consistent across all life forms, simply coding for proteins. Massive studies on animals fed GMOs and vaccinated humans illustrate no adverse effects from DNA consumption or vaccine administration. Such concerns are scientifically unfounded; eating GMO foods or getting vaccines does not alter or harm one’s DNA.

pregnancy COVID-19 vaccine

COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy – the CDC now recommends it

The CDC endorses the COVID-19 vaccine for pregnant individuals based on a study showing no significant safety concerns. Research involving 35,691 pregnant participants found typical vaccination symptoms and no evidence of increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. The findings suggest the vaccine’s efficacy and safety during pregnancy, reinforcing its importance for maternal and fetal health.

turbo cancer

COVID-19 vaccines do not cause turbo cancer

In the era of misinformation, the claim that COVID-19 vaccines cause “turbo cancer” is unsupported by scientific evidence and is likely a myth perpetuated by anti-vaccine proponents. COVID-19 vaccines are extensively tested, safe, and vital in combating the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly for at-risk individuals like those with cancer (Approx. 83 words).