Who are the most annoying antivaccination shills?

Please choose your favorite shill. Or not.

If you have remarks, comments or complaints, just put them in the comments at the bottom. If I missed a category, please tell me that, I’ll try to remember it for future polls.

Time to regulate the antivaccine liars out of existence, Part 1

Miracle-cureThis week, Dorit Rubinstein Reiss, Professor of Law at the University of California Hastings College of  the Law in San Francisco, guest wrote an article on this blog (and I’m grateful when she does) regarding the possibility of using the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC), whose principal mission is the promotion of consumer protection, to regulate or block antivaccine misinformation.

The process to request that the FTC investigate these individuals is relatively easy. And it’s time to change the discussion about vaccines, and make certain that those individuals who make money from lying about vaccines are blocked from doing so.

Pressure from pro-science/pro-vaccine on the Australian state of New South Wales led to an order that Meryl Dorey’s “Australian Vaccination Network (AVN)” must change its name since it “is likely to mislead the public in relation to the nature, objects or functions of AVN.” The core of the argument was that AVN was and continues to be strictly antivaccination, and it’s name seemed to imply it was something else. Continue reading “Time to regulate the antivaccine liars out of existence, Part 1”

Chili’s and the National Autism Association–one more thing

I promised myself that I wouldn’t write anything more about Chili’s and their outstanding decision to back away from providing a donation to the antivaccination front group called the National Autism Association (NAA). Since I made that promise to me, and not to my readers, I get to write about Chili’s again with few consequences. Well, other than spending some time this evening in writing this last post, I promise, about Chili’s. I might choose to write something about the NAA again in the future, because they are kind of reprehensible, as you will soon see.

As I pointed out yesterday, the NAA is much more than just an autism advocacy group that lies about vaccines. It also promotes horrifying treatments for autism such as chelation, which has shown to not be effective. And many of the practitioners of chelation therapy are miscreants and other kinds of low lives. As I’ve mentioned previously, simple math, at the level a third grader would understand, indicates that it make take millions of doses of vaccines to be toxic, and only then if the patients kidneys had failed so nothing would be cleared from the blood. So, NAA is encouraging the use of chelation therapy, which does have risks, to fix a problem that we KNOW doesn’t cause autism, and, in fact, doesn’t even exist in the first place.

They could have just made the same claim that magical water cures autism. Oh I forgot, they are sponsored by Boiron, a homeopathy manufacturer.

© 2014, Skeptical Raptor, LLC. Yeah, I went here for lunch in Los Angeles.
© 2014, Skeptical Raptor, LLC. Yeah, I went here for lunch in Los Angeles.

 

Continue reading “Chili’s and the National Autism Association–one more thing”

Chili’s makes the right choice–the wrap-up

Updated with more good quotes.

Over this past weekend, a social media protest on Twitter, Facebook, reddit and various blogs created an atmosphere where Chili’s, who was planning to contribute 10% of each guest’s check to an organization whose mission is to support the needs of the autism community, was getting stuck in a tight corner. Although the National Autism Association (NAA) appeared to be a fine charity, helping autistic children in numerous ways, their explicit statement that “Vaccinations can trigger or exacerbate autism in some, if not many, children, especially those who are genetically predisposed to immune, autoimmune or inflammatory conditions,” contradicts the vast mountain of evidence that explicitly and clearly refutes any connection between vaccines, vaccine ingredients, and the number of vaccines with autism.

©2014, Wikipedia Commons
©2014, Wikipedia Commons

Continue reading “Chili’s makes the right choice–the wrap-up”

Chili’s does the right thing–severs ties with vaccine refuser group

After an uproar on social media, including Twitter, Facebook, and numerous blog posts (including three from me), Chili’s decided that they would suspend their program to contribute 10% of sales to an antivaccination front group, the National Autism Association, a group that states unequivocally that vaccines cause autism, despite the vast amount of evidence that it’s completely unrelated.

©2014, Wikipedia Commons
©2014, Wikipedia Commons

In a statement on Facebook, Chili’s said:

Chili’s is committed to giving back to the communities in which our guests live and work through local and national Give Back Events. While we remain committed to supporting the children and families affected by autism, we are canceling Monday’s Give Back Event based on the feedback we heard from our guests.

We believe autism awareness continues to be an important cause to our guests and team members, and we will find another way to support this worthy effort in the future with again our sole intention being to help families affected by autism. At Chili’s, we want to make every guest feel special and we thank all of our loyal guests for your thoughtful questions and comments.

I presume that antivaccination lunatics, who lead to more children’s deaths, aren’t a worthy charitable cause for Chili’s. As it should be.

For once, science and rational thinking win. I’d be lying if I didn’t say there’s a big smile on my face.

Chili’s kind of, sort of revises support for an antivaccination group

As reported earlier today and yesterday that on April 7, Chili’s, a chain of sit-down restaurants, is planning to contribute 10% of each guest’s check, across the USA, to an organization whose mission is to support the needs of the autism community. The reasons that Chili’s has chosen to do this are both noble and heartfelt, based on a viral story involving one of their restaurants. On the surface, it appears that this is a great example of being a good corporate citizen, and though I have never eaten at Chili’s, I considered doing so because I strongly support autism advocacy and research. 

©2014, Autism Science Foundation. This group accepts the scientific facts that vaccines do not cause autism, and states it explicitly on their web page.
©2014, Autism Science Foundation. This group accepts the scientific facts that vaccines do not cause autism, and states it explicitly on their web page.

 

Continue reading “Chili’s kind of, sort of revises support for an antivaccination group”

Chili’s stubbornly sticks with its support of an antivaccination group

Yesterday I reported that on April 7, Chili’s, a chain of sit-down restaurants, is planning to contribute 10% of each guest’s check, across the USA, to an organization whose mission is to support the needs of the autism community. The reasons that Chili’s has chosen to do this are both noble and heartfelt, based on a viral story involving one of their restaurants. On the surface, it appears that this is a great example of being a good corporate citizen, and though I have never eaten at Chili’s, I considered doing so because I strongly support autism advocacy and research. 

And never caused by vaccines.
And never caused by vaccines.

Continue reading “Chili’s stubbornly sticks with its support of an antivaccination group”

Don’t unintentionally fund an antivaccination front organization

Sometimes large corporations try to do the right thing, and I’m willing to give them credit for the good works. Many companies contribute to charities and organizations for which executives or employees have a special feeling.

Not an adverse event from vaccines.
Not an adverse event from vaccines.

But sometimes that doesn’t turn out so well. Last year, the fast food restaurant chain, Chick-fil-A got into hot water when it was found contributing to same-sex marriage hate groups. Although it caused a firestorm amongst progressives and decent people, the right-wing religious types flocked to the restaurants to show their support. Eventually the CEO of the chain, S. Truett Cathy, decided to “shut up” about same-sex marriage, he still thinks it’s wrong. I’m not sure any of the kerfuffle about Chick-fil-A had a lasting effect, but people tried.

Recently, it has come to my attention that another restaurant chain is going to make a rather large donation to another group. It actually seemed like a laudable effort, but several people dug down below the surface, and found the effort a lot less praiseworthy. Continue reading “Don’t unintentionally fund an antivaccination front organization”