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Epstein-Barr virus — why we need a vaccine for it

The Epstein-Barr virus is one of the most ubiquitous viruses that infect humans. Around 95% of humans are infected by the virus, so it is probably the most common virus, at least for humans. However, I bet most people haven’t heard of it and are unaware that they have the virus floating around in their bodies.

How did you catch it? It spreads through the saliva, so it could have been from your mother when she shared some of her food with you. Or it could have been from sharing a milkshake while on a date. Or maybe you got it when you kissed your date. In fact, if you caught the virus in this last scenario — as a teen or young adult — then the Epstein-Barr virus may have triggered mononucleosis, or the “kissing disease,” in which a massive immune response against the pathogen causes weeks of sore throat, fever, and debilitating fatigue.

The Epstein-Barr virus is so pervasive, and the outcomes are so minor, you might be wondering why we need a vaccine. The problem is that the outcomes aren’t all that minor — rare, but very serious, outcomes are frequently observed because so many individuals are infected by the disease.

This article will examine what the Epstein-Barr virus is, and why it is so dangerous. Hopefully, it will be obvious why we need a vaccine.

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NIH Director Calls for Rigorous Evaluation of Integrative Medicine to Provide Evidence of Efficacy

NIH Director Calls for Rigorous Evaluation of Integrative Medicine to Provide Evidence of Efficacy – The ASCO Post. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, wants to continue finding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities in cancer because… Read More »NIH Director Calls for Rigorous Evaluation of Integrative Medicine to Provide Evidence of Efficacy