Skip to content
Home » STI

STI

HPV vaccination schedule

HPV vaccination schedule caused decline in infection rates

Unless you’re a noobie to this blog and website, you probably know I’m a big proponent of the human papillomavirus (HPV) anti-cancer vaccine, usually known as Gardasil or Cervarix. And now we have more evidence that the HPV vaccination schedule has caused a significant drop in HPV infection rates in teens.

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the USA. There are more than 40 HPV sub-types that can infect the genital areas of males and females. Additionally, some HPV types can also infect the mouth and throat. HPV is generally transmitted from personal contact during vaginal, anal or oral sex.

HPV is linked to many dangerous cancers in both men and women, such as penile, cervical, anal, mouth and throat cancers. In fact, HPV is believed to cause nearly 5% of all new cancers across the world, making it almost as frightening as tobacco for causing cancer.

Because HPV is so prevalent in adults, blocking the infection in pre-teens, teens and young adults can eventually lower the cancer rate for all HPV-related cancers. Maybe one day, it can be wiped out, like many other infectious diseases just through vaccination.

The evidence that Gardasil and the HPV vaccination schedule are safe and effective is almost overwhelming. Sure, there are a few myths here and there about the vaccine that require occasional debunking. However, there are so few methods to actually prevent cancer – the HPV vaccine, by blocking HPV infections, is one of the best methods to prevent some of the nastiest cancers.

Read More »HPV vaccination schedule caused decline in infection rates

Gardasil (HPV vaccine) coverage and safety in the United States

Gardasil-vaccine-virusGenital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the USA. There are more than 40 HPV sub-types that can infect the genital areas of males and females. These same HPV types can also infect the mouth and throat. They are transmitted from personal contact during vaginal, anal or oral sex.

Some HPV subtypes, such as HPV-6 and HPV-11, can cause warts around the genitals or anus, but have low (but not 0) risk of causing cancers. However, the higher risk subtypes, such as HPV 16 and 18, not only cause approximately 70% of cervical cancers, but they cause most HPV-induced anal (95% linked to HPV), vulvar (50% linked), vaginal (65% linked), oropharyngeal (60% linked) and penile (35% linked) cancers. HPV is estimated to be the cause of nearly 5% of all new cancers across the world.

According to the CDC, roughly 79 million Americans are infected with HPV–approximately 14 million Americans contract HPV every year. Most individuals don’t even know they have the infection until the onset of cancer.Read More »Gardasil (HPV vaccine) coverage and safety in the United States

The beginning of the end of Gardasil–probably not

  More fear mongering from the antivaccination forces, this time claiming that “mainstream news media is widely reporting today that a French teenager has filed a lawsuit against French pharmaceutical company, Sanofi Pasteur, and France’s health regulators, over side-effects that were… Read More »The beginning of the end of Gardasil–probably not

HPV incidence

Why we vaccinate – reduction in HPV incidence in UK

The HPV quadrivalent vaccine, also known as Gardasil (or Silgard in Europe) prevents infection by the human papillomavirus, a sexually transmitted disease. The vaccine specifically targets subtypes 16 and 18, that cause not only approximately 70% of cervical cancers, but also they cause most HPV-induced anal (95%… Read More »Why we vaccinate – reduction in HPV incidence in UK