Jen Glantz, you really should apologize for your flu vaccine refusal

flu vaccine refusal

Pointing out anti-vaccine ignorance is nearly my full-time hobby on this website. Sometimes I read stuff that makes me laugh or shrug, sometimes I have to take it on. And today, I’m going to take on anti-vaccine ignorance by someone who really should apologize for her flu vaccine refusal.

In an article, “I Refuse to Get a Flu Shot, and I Won’t Apologize For It,”Jen Glantz author, who is a self-proclaimed “professional bridesmaid,” wants to believe that she’s smarter than immunologists, public health specialists at the CDC, physicians who have spent 8 years in school and another bunch of years  training to practice medicine, and real scientists. With typical arrogance and ignorance of the anti-vaccine religion, she pontificates on issues that betray her lack of serious education in any biomedical science.

Look, I don’t think credentials matter. I don’t care if Glantz is a high school dropout or has a Ph.D. in immunology. The only thing that matters is evidence, and Glantz conveniently ignores the vast wealth of evidence supporting the safety and effectiveness of the flu vaccine to inform her readers of her irresponsible decision.

Why should I care about Glantz’s flu vaccine refusal? Because I’m the cantankerous feathered dinosaur, and I do not appreciate anti-vaccine cluelessness. And besides, Glantz should go back to doing what she does best – being a bridesmaid. Because she is utterly oblivious to any scientific facts about the flu vaccine. I guess her white privilege, that somehow she is superior to the rest of us who understand public health and the real science behind vaccines, allows her the arrogance of her flu vaccine refusal. Continue reading “Jen Glantz, you really should apologize for your flu vaccine refusal”

This deadly viral epidemic frightens me

1918-spanish-fluA deadly disease has entered the USA. And it took its first victim for the year, yesterday.(1)

During the past 10 years, this disease has killed up to 49,000 Americans, of all ages and demographic groups, annually.(2)

On average, 250,000-500,000 people die from the disease every year.(3)

During an average year, over 200,000 Americans are hospitalized for this viral infection.(4)

During one horrible outbreak of the disease, approximately 50-100 million people, mostly young healthy adults, were killed by the virus worldwide, all in one year.(5)

There is an amazing prevention for this disease that most people ignore–vaccines.(6)

References:

  1. DHEC: First Flu Related Death in the State.
  2. Estimating Seasonal Influenza-Associated Deaths in the United States: CDC Study Confirms Variability of Flu
  3. WHO | Influenza (Seasonal).
  4. Seasonal Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations in the United States 
  5. Reconstruction of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic Virus
  6. Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine

 

Vaccine deniers use logical fallacies to prove superiority

The natural immunity fallacy.
The natural immunity fallacy.

I frequently employ the term Logical Fallacy to demonstrate a logical or rational failure of a particular argument, especially those who adhere to anti-science or even pseudoscience points of view, like antivaccinationists. Logical fallacies are used to win arguments, despite the merits of said argument.  It’s also used to divert the reader (or listener) to a totally irrelevant point, but has the illusion of being logical.  

There are several definitions of what constitutes a logical fallacy:

A logical fallacy is, roughly speaking, an error of reasoning. When someone adopts a position, or tries to persuade someone else to adopt a position, based on a bad piece of reasoning, they commit a fallacy.–Logical Fallacies

An argument that sometimes fools human reasoning, but is not logically valid.–Fallacious Argument

In logic and rhetoric, a fallacy is usually an improper argumentation in reasoning resulting in a misconception or presumption. By accident or design, fallacies may exploit emotional triggers in the listener or interlocutor (appeal to emotion), or take advantage of social relationships between people (e.g. argument from authority). Fallacious arguments are often structured using rhetorical patterns that obscure any logical argument.–Wikipedia

Generally, in discussions or debates, those who lack scientific evidence (which is based on the logical scientific method), have only one choice–resort to one of many logical fallacies. Over time, distinct types of logical fallacies that help define a failure of a pseudoscientific argument. Let’s look at one that is popular with the antivaccination crowd.
Continue reading “Vaccine deniers use logical fallacies to prove superiority”