Sharp increase in vaccination delays in Oregon

Portland, Oregon and Mt. Hood

Recently, an article was published in PediatricsFrequency of Alternative Immunization Schedule Use in a Metropolitan Area by Steve G. Robison, Holly Groom,  and Collette Young, that studied the vaccination rate of children in the Portland area. It found that between 2006 and 2009, the number of children consistently delaying vaccinations in the Portland area increased more than three times.

In 2009, approximately 9.5% of Portland-area parents (out of a study population of nearly 98,000 children) consistently did not follow the recommended vaccine schedule for children from birth to nine months of age. Parents were considered “shot limiters” if they would not allow their children to be vaccinated with more than one or two shots at a time. The study noted that many who limit shots may be following an alternative schedule and plan to eventually complete the schedule, many do not follow through. Shot limited children also had more physician visits, presumably to complete the course of vaccinations.

According to Robison, an epidemiologist with the Oregon Sentinel Immunization Surveillance region, “There is no benefit to spacing out shots or getting fewer shots per visit. It is a very carefully constructed schedule intended to provide the most benefit when these kids need it.”

It remains unknown if the Oregon observations are applicable to the nation as a whole. However, if children haven’t received the proper vaccinations, it may reduce herd immunity leading to increased risks of outbreaks.

via Parents in Oregon refusing vaccines sharply increases | Vaccine News Daily.

Measles outbreak in Ireland

Preventable childhood disease epidemics keep breaking out throughout the world. Whooping cough has spread throughout the USA, and measles cases have risen dramatically in the UK. Now 17 new cases of measles have been reported during the last week in Southern Ireland bringing the total number of confirmed cases in West Cork to 42. Physicians in that part of Ireland are urging parents to vaccinate their children 

According to Dr. Fiona Ryan, a consultant in public health medicine, “At the moment, the best way to ensure safety is to ensure that babies are not exposed to older children who may not be vaccinated and who are incubating the disease. Some cases have unvaccinated brothers and sisters, so they are very likely to become infected. Unfortunately the symptoms are very non-specific before they get the rash.” Continue reading “Measles outbreak in Ireland”

Whooping cough: Washington State lacks funds to fight epidemic

Whooping cough patients per county

The New York Times is reporting that the State of Washington has been hit by a whooping cough (pertussis) epidemic that has hit 1,284 individuals in 2012, 10 times the 128 seen at this point in 2011. At this rate, there could be over 3000 cases by the end of 2012. Of those infected so far in 2012, 86 infants (under age of 1 year) required hospitalization, including 19 of whom were under 2 months. Pertussis immunization, with the DTaP vaccine, does not confer full immunity to the child until the third vaccination at 6 months of age, during which the infant is susceptible to catching the disease from adults with lapsed immunity or other children who are not vaccinated. However, even children with the first vaccination have some immunity, so the infection could be milder than in a child without any vaccination. Continue reading “Whooping cough: Washington State lacks funds to fight epidemic”